Monday, November 7, 2016

Pork Tenderloin and Cannellini Beans



If you're looking for an easy, delicious way to serve a crowd (Election Day comfort food perhaps?) that's also healthy and reasonably priced, pork tenderloin is your answer. 
I love any cuts of pork, particularly the shoulder, which is loaded with fat, resulting in savory meat that falls off the bone. That, however, takes 12 hours to cook with this recipe, if you're interested.
I'm more likely to buy the tenderloin when time is a factor, and even though it's so lean, with proper seasonings and accompaniments, it can be just as satisfying as the fattier cuts of pork.
After seeing an Instagram photo from my friend Domenica of her cannelloni beans soaking, I was inspired to do the same as an accompaniment to the pork.
  I've had friends say that they made dried beans that ended up too hard, probably from not cooking long enough. That's happened to me too and the way I prepare them now to avoid that is this way: 
Wash the beans and drain them, then put into a pot with water about one inch above the beans and bring to a rolling boil for a couple of minutes. Skim off the scum that forms. Turn off the heat and let the beans sit in the water overnight.
The next morning, drain the beans, add fresh water to cover, plus a few squirts of olive oil and some fresh sage. Let the beans simmer for two hours, then turn off the heat and let the beans sit for a few more hours.
Come back to the beans before you're ready to serve them and test for doneness. They should be soft enough now, but if not, cook a little longer. Drain the beans again, saving some of the cooking liquid.
Place a healthy amount of olive oil (1/4 cup or so) on the bottom of a clean pot, add as much minced garlic as you like (I like a lot); briefly soften over mild heat, then add the beans back to the pot, to reheat. At this point, season them with salt and other herbs of your choosing - sage and/or rosemary are nice here. (don't add the salt before the beans are soft or it will impede the cooking). Add a little more olive oil if you like (a few tablespoons), and some of the reserved cooking liquid if they seem too dry (but not too much, since you're going to have more liquid from the roast to drizzle on later).
 I flavored the beans using some of the seasoned salts I made from some of the herbs growing in my garden - thyme, sage, rosemary, lemon balm and bay leaf. If you've still got herbs growing in your garden, it's not too late to make the salt. It makes a great hostess gift. Just cut the herbs, dry them on a cookie sheet and after a few days, put them in the food processor with some coarse salt. I used a salt from Sicily that I got from Gustiamo.com, but you could also use kosher salt.
The salt is fantastic on vegetables, fish and meats - in this case the pork tenderloin. Just slather some Dijon mustard on the pork, then sprinkle on a generous amount of the seasoned salt and a good grinding of fresh black pepper.
Cover it with aluminum foil, and roast at 400 degrees for about 45 minutes - 1 hour. Remove from oven and let it rest for 15 minutes. Reserve the liquid to pour over the roast later (Before serving it, I whirred it with a stick blender to make it more homogenous.)
Arrange the beans on the bottom of the serving dish, then place the sliced pork on top. Just before serving, pour the heated sauce on top. It's tender enough to eat with just a fork, and it's so easy and delicious, it'll become one of your go-to recipes.
Cannellini beans and pork tenderloin
printable recipe here

Pork Tenderloin
Smear pork tenderloin with Dijon mustard, then sprinkle on freshly ground black pepper and seasoned salts. (If you don't have seasoned salts, use some kosher salt and sprinkle on herbs de Provence, or use minced fresh rosemary, sage or a combination of herbs.)
Roast covered at 400 degrees for 45 minutes-one hour. Remove from oven and let it rest for 15 minutes. Meanwhile, remove the liquid from the pan, strain it and whir it with a stick blender to homogenize it (or use a whisk if you don't have a stick blender).

Arrange the cooked beans on the bottom of a serving dish, then slice the meat and place it on the beans. Finally, reheat the liquid and pour it over all the meat and beans.

Cannellini Beans
Wash the dry beans and drain them, then put into a pot and bring to a rolling boil for a couple of minutes. Skim off the scum that forms. turn off the heat and let the beans sit in the water overnight.
The next morning, drain the beans, add fresh water to cover, plus a few squirts of olive oil and some fresh sage. Let the beans simmer for two hours, then turn off the heat and let the beans sit for a few more hours.
Come back to the beans before you're ready to serve them and test for doneness. They should be soft enough now, but if not, cook a little longer. Drain the beans again, saving some of the cooking liquid.
Place a healthy amount of olive oil (1/4 cup or so) on the bottom of a clean pot, add as much minced garlic as you like (I like a lot); briefly soften over mild heat, then add the beans back to the pot. to reheat. At this point, season them with salt and other herbs of your choosing - sage and/or rosemary are nice here. (don't add the salt before the beans are soft or it will impede the cooking). Add a little more olive oil if you like (a few tablespoons), and some of the reserved cooking liquid if they seem too dry.

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8 comments:

Rosa said...

A fabulous combination and scrumptious dish!

Cheers,

Rosa

Paola said...

An ideal dish for a crowd and I imagine so satisfying! I often make cannellini beans to serve alone, with greens, or along side Beefsteak Fiorentina. Using them as a base for roasted meat makes perfect sense.

Proud Italian Cook said...

What a delicious combination, the pork, beans and your salt. Well I learned something, I've been cooking beans wrong, definitely not long enough and I never boiled them before I soaked them overnight, maybe now I'll use up those bags of beans I have sitting in my pantry!

Chiara Giglio said...

faccio spesso il filetto di maiale, voglio provare questa tua ricetta, mi sembra fantastica Linda !

Janie said...

What a great combination and I love your tips for cooking perfect beans.

Pat @ Mille Fiori Favoriti said...

This is a wonderful autumn meal, Linda! i sometimes have trouble with getting dried beans soft because of our altitude. I found pre-soaking and using a pressure cooker to cook them helps.

Frank Fariello said...

Yep, pork and beans is one of those combinations that was just *meant* to be...

Claudia said...

I cook a ton of chicken, a little beef and a medium amount of fish. And pork seems to get lost. This is comfort easily made - love how you did the beans and it really is no-fuss - just some advanced knowledge to do something the night before. Pork and beans is a winning match indeed!