Tuesday, October 29, 2013

Domenica Marchetti at Le Virtù

Sometimes there is a confluence of all things good and right in the universe and one of those things happened last week, when Le Virtù, my favorite Philadelphia restaurant organized a special evening featuring foods from Domenica Marchetti's latest cookbook, "The Glorious Vegetables of Italy." 
Each course was accompanied by wines that complemented the food perfectly - mostly from Abruzzo, but also from the regions of Le Marche and Puglia. The bread service included a cherry tomato and red onion focaccia; pizza bianca with roasted fennel and assorted grilled flatbreads (sorry, I forgot to take a photo.) The breads were terrific alongside this chicory salad, made more savory with the addition of anchovies in the dressing - similar to the flavor in a Caesar salad.
On a cold winter's night, Domenica's ribollita satisfies both body and soul.
The winter risotto was a perfect blend of sweet butternut squash and bitter Tuscan kale, held together with a swirl of Parmesan cheese.
Chef Joe Cicala deviated from Domenica's recipes for the main course - whole roasted suckling pig. The crackling outer skin was irresistible, along with the tender meat flavored with garlic and rosemary.
Vegetables followed, including my favorite, broccoli romano -  hard to find in my neck of the woods. It  too, was prepared with anchovy sauce, but as with many recipes that include anchovies, you'd never know it. The anchovies just heighten the flavors without overpowering the vegetable.
 Served at room temperature, a winter salad of cauliflower had a fiery kick to it.
 Fennel with sultana raisins and chili pepper offered a balance of sweet and spicy.
And speaking of sweet, the evening ended on a high note with a pumpkin semifreddo and sweet potato fritelle resting atop a mocha sauce, with toasted pumpkin seeds, prepared by pastry chef Angela Ranalli Cicala.
If you missed the evening with Domenica, there are still plenty of reasons to come down to this gem of a Philly restaurant.  The restaurant, owned by Francis Cratil and Cathy Lee, offers one of the most authentic and delicious menus featuring the food of Abruzzo. Their new fall menu is now available here.

Winter Risotto with butternut squash and Tuscan kale
from "The Glorious Vegetables of Italy" by Domenica Marchetti
printable recipe here
  • 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1/2 cup diced yellow onion
  • 1 pound butternut squash, peeled, seeded and cut into 1/2-inch dice
  • 8 ounces Tuscan kale, coarsely shredded
  • 1/2 teaspoon fine sea salt
  • 2 cups Arborio rice
  • 1 cup dry white wine
  • 5 to 6 cups vegetable or chicken broth, heated
  • 1 tablespoon butter
  • 1/2 cup freshly grated Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese, plus more for serving
  • Freshly ground black pepper

Warm the olive oil and the onion in a large Dutch oven or other heavy-bottomed pot over medium-low heat. Cook, stirring often, for 7 to 8 minutes, or until the onion is softened and translucent. Add the squash and kale and toss to coat them with the oil. Sprinkle in the salt. Cover the pot and cook, stirring occasionally, for 15 to 20 minutes, or until the kale is completely wilted and the cubes of squash are just tender.
Pour in the rice and cook, stirring, for 2 to 3 minutes, until the grains are shiny and glassy-looking. Raise the heat to medium-high and pour in the wine. Let it bubble for a minute or so, until it is almost absorbed. Reduce the heat to medium-low and begin to add the broth, a ladleful at a time, stirring frequently, until the liquid is almost absorbed. You do not need to stir the risotto constantly, but be sure that you do stir it often, and take care that the rice grains do not stick to the bottom of the pot.
Continue to cook the risotto and add broth, 1 or 2 ladlefuls at a time, for 20 to 25 minutes, until the rice is almost but not completely cooked. It should be al dente--still rather firm and chalky at the center. Check by tasting a few grains. Stir in the butter and cheese. Then stir in a final ladleful of broth to achieve a creamy texture. The risotto should not be stiff or runny; it should mound softly on a spoon. Taste and season with salt and pepper, if you like.
Spoon the risotto into shallow rimmed bowls and serve immediately, with additional Parmigiano cheese on the side.

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Rosa's Yummy Yums said...

Fantastic food! Domenica Marchetti is awesome.



Stacey Snacks said...

It all looks wonderful. I am enjoying Domenica's Glorious Vegetables of Italy book, and we wish we could have joined you last Thurs night!

domenicacooks said...

1. Where did that ruddy Irish complexion come from?

2. I need a hair stylist

3. Thank you so very much for being part of the evening. It meant a lot to have you there.

4. I hope it didn't take you two hours to get home!

Un abbraccio

AdriBarr said...

What a feast, and what an honor for Domenica. Her book really is a joy. I bet teh folks at the restaurant had a ball. Thanks for this post - I feel SO left out, so to speak. I am considering a move to the east coast. The food looks better out your way, and the people are more fun.

Proud Italian Cook said...

Oh my goodness, everything looks and sounds amazing, I love her book/books. I wish I was there to enjoy! sniff, sniff...

Michelle - Majella Home Cooking said...

How amazing! I so wish I could have come. Thanks for the recap, Linda. Look forward to planning a dinner date this winter.

bellini said...

Absolutely everything, and I mean everything is what I would order on a menu. Sounds delish.

Gracie said...

I'm officially hungry now! I've tried so many of your recipes and even though I never taste your originals I have to say they weren't that bad! Thanks for giving me always new ideas....

Cathy at Wives with Knives said...

You go to the most interesting events, Linda. I love to following along and appreciate you taking me along with you. All those beautiful dishes look so delicious. I don't think I can resist trying the winter risotto with butternut squash.

Unknown said...

What a marvelous event. I just love Domenica Marchetti

Roz Corieri Paige said...

Linda, I cannot even begin to imagine how wonderful and delicious this event for Domenica's cooking could be! I am so envious of what you are able to experience in the NE, compared to what I am not able to experience here in the SE. So I truly appreciate every post that you share that allows me the vicarious chance to live in and through each of your posts. I have one of Domenica's books, but now know that I've got to have them all. The risotto sounds perfect for Thanksgiving (or now!). xo, Roz

janie said...

Oh my! I can only say that since I missed this amazing dinner I will have to start cooking from Domenica's great new book.

Frank Fariello said...

What a feast! How I wish I could have been there... but at least this is more inspiration (if any were needed) to keep cooking from the book!